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RED LINE WORKOUTS.


So after you've built your engine and your body can handle those easy, consistent and slow miles it's time to incorporate some good quality hard running workouts. These are going to allow you to push your pace, run the hills or be in peak fitness ready for a race day. As always there are a few guidelines I like to follow to help me get the most out of these workouts. 

Firstly these hard workout days are more demanding so to get most out of your body and limit the risk of injury I recommend doing them when rested rather than a fatigued state. Due to the higher demand on your body you will need a longer period of recovery after so follow it up by a rest day or active recovery day. 

As a general rule, I recommend no more than 30 minutes of hard running (this does not include warm up and cool down). After 30 minute at that intensity your body will tend to fatigue and you won't be producing the same output or getting the benefits from the workout you want. Very elite athletes may be able to handle a longer duration or put a higher output of work in during that 30 minute period.

Personally I find doing these types of workouts at the beginning of the week means I can get the good quality reps that I want and need in order to see improvements. Rest on a Wednesday, for example, and then the latter part of the week is simply slow and easy running to make up the miles.

Finally the frequency in which you do these workouts. If I don't have anything planned or any training goal I will aim to fit in these programs every 10-14 days. If training for a specific event I will start to increase the frequency to 1 or 2 every 7-10 days a few weeks before to help reach peak fitness. 


Mile Repeats

I guess you could call this the classic track workout that you see a lot of athletes use in college or university. This is my favorite hard day workout, it helps me improve pace while peaking for a race. Here is how I would layout this style of workout


Warm up 

  • 2 miles (slow & steady)

  • Dynamic movements (10 minutes)

  • 1 mile (adding some explosive strives)

Reps

  • 1 mile (record the time and half it for recovery)

  • 3 minute 30 seconds (active or stationary choice is yours)

  • Repeat until you've done 5x or around 30 minutes of hard work.

Cool Down

  • 2 miles (slow & steady)

  • Static stretches (20 minutes)

Notes

Remember if you are new to this workout or earlier in your training plan you may have slower miles and longer rest periods. If this is the case you may even have less reps as you build into the plan. That's fine, you will always get more by personalising it.


Death by 400m

Generally a simple workout. Turn up with a good playlist in the ears, start fast, count down the reps and finish fast.


Warm up 

  • 2 miles (slow & steady)

  • Dynamic movements (10 minutes)

  • 1 mile (adding some explosive strives)

Reps 

20x400m - 60 seconds rest between reps


Cool Down 

  • 2 miles (slow & steady)

  • Static stretches (20 minutes)

Notes 

The aim is to try and maintain the same speed/time per 400m from the first reps to the last. 

Remember the 1-11 should be ok to hold that speed but 15 onwards is where you are struggling to maintain and hold on. Adjust reps or rest to match your ability.


Any question about this post or previous get in contact - alex@agperformance.co.uk



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